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Who Are You?

A statistical snapshot of the typical Joe and Jane Advancement




Look around your office. You're likely to see—or perhaps be—someone who fits the description of a typical advancement officer, statistically speaking: a white person who's been in advancement for three to five years, works in the development office of a private doctoral or research university in District II, holds a bachelor's degree but has no additional professional certification, and has some management responsibility but isn't the head of a major department. With those factors, the shared characteristics of typical advancement officers end. Here's how traits differ:

The typical male advancement officer works in major gifts, is about 43 years old, and earns an average salary of $75,500.

The typical female advancement officer works in annual giving, is about 42 years old, and earns an average salary of $57,600.

The most significant demographic characteristics of the profession are sex and race. About two-thirds of respondents are women, and white people outnumber people of color by a ratio of 9-to-1 (a conservative number, given that about 4 percent of respondents declined to answer this question or left it blank).

Polar opposites

What are some job elements of those who are at opposite ends of the salary range? (Survey analysts discovered these data points when they tabulated responses according to minimum and maximum salary ranges, among other criteria.) Although we have suppressed some factors to ensure respondents' anonymity, consider some of the traits of the highest- and lowest-paid survey participant:

The highest-paid respondent is a white woman who is between the ages of 46 and 50, has more than 20 years of experience, has been at her current institution for three to five years, manages both people and budgets, is head of a major department and reports to the institution's CEO or board, and reports earning an annual salary of $246,000.

The lowest-paid respondent also is a white woman who's been at her current institution for three to five years and manages both people and budgets, but that's where these two advancement officers part company.

The lowest-paid respondent is between 36 and 40 years of age, has 11 to 15 years of experience, heads a major department but doesn't report to the CEO or board, and reports earning an annual salary of $10,500.

 

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