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Pam Russell
Director of Communications
CASE
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russell@case.org






 

For Immediate Release
June 17, 2014

CASE Announces Recipients of 2014 Research Awards in Educational Advancement

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The Council for Advancement and Support of Education has recognized four outstanding works of research in philanthropy and alumni relations for educational advancement.

The Research Awards in Educational Advancement recognize published books or articles, doctoral dissertations and master's theses.

The winning entries feature research on:

  • How the affiliation of Atlanta University, Morehouse College and Spelman College in 1929 led to new opportunities in higher education for African Americans and funding for historically black colleges and universities
  • Best fundraising approaches to employ and those to avoid for engaging alumni of color at colleges and universities
  • The value of increasing alumni presence on college and university governing boards in raising funds from other graduates and constituents
  • The donating behavior and engagement level of alumni who were low-income students

Representatives from the CASE commissions selected winning entries for the H.S. Warwick Research Awards in Alumni Relations for Educational Advancement and the John Grenzebach Awards for Outstanding Research in Philanthropy for Educational Advancement. No entries were selected to receive the Alice L. Beeman Awards in Communications and Marketing for Educational Advancement.

This year's winners are:

  • Sheryl A. Bourgeois, executive vice president for advancement, marketing and communications, at Chapman University. Bourgeois received the John Grenzebach Award for Outstanding Research in Philanthropy for Educational Advancement, outstanding doctoral dissertation, for "The Relationship Between Alumni Presence on the Governing Board and Institutional Alumni Support," completed at Claremont Graduate University. The dissertation explores the value of having alumni serve on institutional governing boards, especially the boards of private, master's comprehensive institutions, and implications that this has on fundraising success—not just from alumni but other constituents as well.
  • Vida L. Avery, resource development specialist for the Center for Grants Development at the Harris County Department of Education in Houston, Texas. Avery received the John Grenzebach Award for Outstanding Research in Philanthropy for Educational Advancement, outstanding published scholarship, for Philanthropy in Black Higher Education: A Fateful Hour Creating the Atlanta University System, published by Palgrave Macmillan. Her book describes the affiliation of Atlanta University, Morehouse College and Spelman College that formed the Atlanta University System and the relationship between John Hope, the first black president of Morehouse College and Atlanta University, and industrial philanthropists, who played a significant role in developing higher education for blacks.
  • Jerold S. Laguilles, coordinator of institutional research at Springfield College. Laguilles received the H.S. Warwick Research Awards in Alumni Relations for Educational Advancement, outstanding doctoral dissertation, for "What Kind of Alumni do Low-Income Students Become? An Investigation of the Relationship between Income Status and Future Alumni Involvement," completed at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His dissertation examines the level of alumni engagement of low-income students and finds that with respect to volunteering or donating behavior, students with low-income status are no different than students with high-income status. However, low-income students are associated with lower donation amounts when compared to high-income students.
  • Marybeth Gasman, professor of higher education at the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Education, and director of the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions, and Nelson Bowman III, executive director of development at Prairie View A&M University. Gasman and Bowman received the H.S. Warwick Research Awards in Alumni Relations for Educational Advancement, outstanding published scholarship, for Engaging Diverse College Alumni: The Essential Guide to Fundraising, published by Routledge. The book provides a comprehensive overview of philanthropy in diverse cultures and offers proven best practices for fundraisers at colleges and universities to most effectively engage diverse alumni. 

About CASE

CASE believes in advancing education to transform lives and society. As a global nonprofit membership association of educational institutions, CASE helps develop the communities of professional practice that build institutional resilience and success in challenging times. The communities include staff engaged in alumni relations, fundraising, marketing, student recruitment, stakeholder engagement, crisis communications and government relations. CASE is volunteer-led and uses the intellectual capital of senior practitioners to build capacity and capability across the world.

CASE has offices in Washington, D.C., London, Singapore and Mexico City. Member institutions include more than 3,700 colleges and universities, primary and secondary independent and international schools, and nonprofit organizations in 82 countries. CASE serves nearly 88,000 practitioners. For more information about CASE, please visit www.case.org.

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